Niagara winery: Inniskillin

Can you believe this view???

When in Canada, you should visit this wonderful place at least once. The scenery is breathtaking!

Since this is a food blog, I’m obviously ain’t gonna stop at showing you this natural wonder. Nearby, in a place called Niagara-on-the-lake, you will find lots of winery dotted around. We went to one of the most famous Canadian winery, called Inniskillin.

Inniskillin is most famous for its icewine. Apparently, they beat many of the European winery when competing in this category.

The tour of the winery costs only $5. Cheap if you compare that with wine tours in Europe. Here’s our guide showing us the grapes for icewine.

Apart from icewine, they also grow other grapes such as Riesling, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. I was surprised that Pinot Noir was able to survive Canadian climate.

They let us try the Pinot Noir grape. Yums.

After the tour of the winery (this included the usual tour of cellar, where you see all the vats and barrels of wine being stored.) it was time for the wine tasting. Unfortunately, we found that with the exception of the icewine, the wine given were a real let down. So what was all the fuss about Inniskillin? (apart from the icewine).

Well of course we went on to try their other wines on offer inside their shop, for a small fee.

Here’s the pretty cosy interior of the shop.

The wine list on offer.

My, what a difference they were from the wine that was served.  I’m sorry, but old world wine still trumps new world when it comes to blending good reds in general. We all agreed that their whites were pretty good though. Here are the ones we think were worth buying:

1. Pinot Noir Rose. They may not have made the best red Pinot Noir, but their Rose was pretty smooth and fruity. Perfect for those who   are just starting on wines or those who like the sweeter, fruitier wines.

2. Three Vineyards Chardonnay. Crisp white that is blended just fine. A little oaky yet subtle sweetness. I’m not the biggest fan of chardonnay but this one is very drinkable.

3. The best of the whites I think is this 2010 Legacy Riesling. Dry yet mineral wine but easy on the acidity. I love this one. Of course, this had to be more expensive than the other two! LOL.

By the end of the day, a crate of rose and half a dozen of the Riesling were bought (Sugamama’s bf is the major buyer here, since we can’t be bringing so much wine with us.) A very good and tipsy day out. I have to say that the tour was only so-so, very basic talk on wine so is good for beginner wine buffs. Well, for a fiver I don’t think you get much better deal than this, though. If you are a big wine fan like Papa Salvatore, then go there, skip the tour, and give the wines a taste at their bar. Five bucks can get you several tasters!

-M.

 

UPDATE: I meant to put this up but I forgot. Here is a short and dizzy video of me on the boat going into the Horseshoe Fall in Niagara.

Wine finds: non-white wines that goes with meat and fish

I’ve caught the mother of all flus right now so bear with me if I don’t make complete sense in this post. I’ve just arrived in Canada to visit Sugamama so more things to come on this website. For now, let me just make a quick post about some wine that my family and I had tried over the past month that went well with our surf and turf dish. I do think that these wine will go with both fish and meat. Although when having something with seafood, people tend to say go for the white. I used to think that is how one should always do in order to not have a bad clashing taste of fish and wine in your mouth. But then, when you have a fine piece of red meat, you’ll always want to have it with a glass of red. There are wines that definitely go with both red meat and fish. Here’s what we had as selected by Papa Salvatore.

 If you can’t decide if red is the choice… how about a rose? This lightly sparkling Beaujolais-rose is a good one for those who are looking for something light and fruity. The cost is only 66 ringgit! Cheap and cheerful!

This is a vapolicella. A red that is medium bodied and works well with surf and turf themes. The tannin is not very pronounced in this so it’s very palatable for the people who are only just starting to drink wine. Again the price was not very steep and this bottle of San Pedro was very good.

Rioja. This is probably considered a heavy wine but this Vinas de Gain was surprisingly well suited with the meat and fish. This wine has a dark colour and more tannic so I would have though it would clash with fish. But no, since Rioja has a short time in the ageing barrel, it was fruity and crisp.

Finally, the most expensive one of all was this Burgundy. 2004 Chateau de la Tour Clos-Vougeot Grand Cru. Quite fruity like berries, yet a tone of minerals can be tasted. It is slightly tannic and light bodied. I like this wine because it is really mellow and I can have this all day and not feel sick.

So what is your opinion on wine that could go well with both fish and meat? Yes, we could just have BOTH white and red wines at the table but for argument’s sake what kind of wine would you choose?

Anyway, time for me to take more paracetamol and go to bed.

-M.